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    • "God so loved the world," John 3:14-21 March 15, 2018
      Gods love surpasses human boundaries God loves real sinners Such love in Christ is not bound or conditioned by mans response nor least of all dependent on it Gods love is unconditional as is seen Christ who died for all sinners That not all believe is not due to Gods lack of love but to mans rejection and disbelief
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Announcements for the week of January 25, 2015

The Smalcad Arcticles

Part III, III. Repentance

3 This is what the beginning of true repentance is like. Here man must hear such a judgment as this: “You are all of no account. Whether you are manifest   sinners or saints,2 you must all become other than you now are and do otherwise than you now do, no matter who you are and no matter how great, wise, mighty, and holy you may think yourselves. Here no one is godly,” etc.

4 To this office of the law the New Testament immediately adds the consoling promise of grace in the Gospel. This is to be believed, as Christ says in Mark 1:15, “Repent and believe in the Gospel,” which is to say, “Become different, do       otherwise, and believe my promise.” 5 John, who preceded Christ, is called a preacher of repentance — but for the remission of sins. That is, John was to accuse them all and convince them that they were sinners in order that they might know how they stood before God and recognize themselves as lost men. In this way they were to be prepared to receive grace from the Lord and to expect and accept from him the forgiveness of sins. 6 Christ himself says this in Luke 24:47, “Repentance and the forgiveness of sins should be preached in his name to all nations.”

15-01-25, Epiphany 3, BA-2015B


Announcements for Week of March 11, 2018

The Close of the Commandments

TwoTabletsWhat does God say about all of these commandments? He says, “I, the Lord your God, am a jealous God, punishing the children for the sin of the fathers to the third and fourth generation of those who hate Me, but showing love to a thousand generations of those who love Me and keep My commandments” (Exodus 20:5-6).


Luther on Hebrews

He who fears death or is unwilling to die is not a Christian to a sufficient degree; for those who fear death still lack faith in the resurrection, since they love this life more than they love the life to come. Properly speaking, they are those about whom Ps. 106:24 says: “They despised the pleasant land.” He who does not die willingly should not be called a Christian. Therefore Chrysostom, with reference to this passage, censures those who mourn the dead. He says: “Those who truly deserve to be mourned are those who still fear death and shudder, who still do not believe in the resurrection.” Therefore when such people pray “Thy kingdom come,” they either do not pray at all or they pray against themselves; that is, they mock both God and themselves, and they have been baptized in vain, since, according to what the apostle says in Rom. 6:3–4, as many of us as are baptized into the death of Christ are certainly baptized to accept death quickly and to attain to the image of Christ more quickly. But you might say: “I do not fear death, but I do fear an evil death, because ‘the death of sinners is the worst, and evils shall destroy the unrighteous man’ ” (cf. Ps. 34:22). But he who says this proves clearly that he is deficient in faith in Christ, for he does not believe that Christ is “the Lamb of God who takes away his sins” (cf. John 1:29). For the less firmly this is believed, the more death is feared; and the more firmly it is believed, the more confidently death is despised. For it is true that only the awareness of sin makes death dreadful, because “sin is the sting of death” (1 Cor. 15:56). But only faith in Christ removes the awareness of sin; for “the victory has been given to us through Jesus Christ,” as stated above (cf. 1 Cor. 15:57). For God makes death, judgment, and hell manifest in order to show the power of faith in Christ, so that a Christian may overcome these through faith. For those dreadful things are nothing else than exercises through which faith should become “strong as death and hard as hell” (cf. Song of Sol. 8:6), although they try vigorously with might and violence to separate the heart from trust in Christ. (Luther’s Works Vol 29, 137–138)


18-03-11, Lent 4, BA-2018B

Announcements for the Week of November 19, 2017


7] …We must retain in the Church this doctrine, namely, that we receive the remission of sins freely for Christ’s sake, by faith. We must also retain this doctrine, namely, that human traditions are useless services, and therefore neither sin nor righteousness should be placed in meat, drink, clothing, and like things, the use of which Christ wished to be left free, since He says, Matt. 15:11: Not that which goeth into the mouth defileth the man; and Paul, Rom. 14:17: The kingdom 8] of God is not meat and drink. Therefore the bishops have no right to frame traditions in addition to the Gospel, that they may merit the remission of sins, that they may be services which God is to approve as righteousness, and which burden consciences, as though it were a sin to omit them. All this is taught by that one passage in Acts 15:9, where the apostles say [Peter says] that hearts are purified by faith. And then they prohibit the imposing of a yoke, and show how great a danger this is, and enlarge upon the sin of those who burden the Church. (Apology, XXVIII. Ecclesiastical Power, Para. 7-8)

17-11-19, Pentecost 24, BA-2017A

Announcements for the Week of August 20, 2017

(Tappert Edition)

We should leave our body, too, for the Gospel. But it would be silly to conclude from this that it is a service to God to commit suicide and to leave our body without the command of God. So it is silly to maintain that it is a service to God to leave possessions, friends, wife, and children without the command of God.

It is evident, therefore, that they wickedly twist the saying of Christ in applying it to monastic life, unless perhaps the statement that they will receive a hundredfold in this life applies here. Many become monks not for the sake of the Gospel but for the sake of food and leisure; instead of a slender inheritance they find the most ample riches.

But as the whole monastic system is full of counterfeits, so they quote passages of Scripture under false pretenses. Thus they are guilty of a double sin—deceiving men, and doing so under the pretext of the divine name.

They quote another passage on perfection (Matt. 19:21), “If you would be perfect, go, sell what you possess and give to the poor; and come, follow me.” This passage has exercised many people because they imagined that perfection consists in casting off possessions and the control of property. (42-45)


17-08-20, Pentecost 11, BA-2017A

Announcements for the Week of August 13, 2017

TABLE OF DUTIES (Luther’s Small Catechism)
Certain passages of scripture for various holy orders and positions, admonishing them about their duties and responsibilities

What the Hearers Owe Their Pastors

The Lord has commanded that those who preach the gospel should receive their living from the gospel. 1 Cor. 9:14

Anyone who receives instruction in the Word must share all good things with his instructor. Do not be deceived: God cannot be mocked. A man reaps what he sows. Gal. 6:6-7

17-08-13, Pentecost 10, BA-2017A

Announcements for the Week of November 27, 2016

liturgy2In our individualistic society, where everyone wants to do things his own way, one of the worst things we can do in our liturgies is cater to all these individual tastes. Variety does not solve problems but creates them. Such a view suggests that God is not really present, a view that we encourage with our vapid liturgies that seek to adapt the liturgy to the culture.” (Lutheran Worship: History and Practice, p39, ft.6 (Just))



Announcements for the Week of November 20, 2016



“Before him (God) we acknowledge that we are sinners, and we plead for forgiveness. His forgiveness is given us, and we, freed and forgiven, acclaim his as our great and gracious God as we apply to ourselves the words he has used to make himself known to us.” (Lutheran Worship, Introduction)




Announcements for the Week of November 13, 2016



“Our Lord speaks and we listen. His Word bestows what is says. Faith is born from what is heard acknowledges the gifts received with eager thankfulness and praise. Music is drawn into this thankfulness and praise, enlarging and elevating the adoration of our gracious giver God.” (Lutheran Worship, Introduction)







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